Aktuelle Themen für Bachelor- und Masterarbeiten

Aktuelle Themen für Bachelor- und Masterarbeiten im Fach Hydrologie können Sie der nachstehenden Tabelle, bzw. den entsprechenden Aushängen am "roten" Brett des Faches entnehmen. Ebenso können Themen auch direkt mit den Betreuern, Herrn JProf. Dr. Tobias Schütz oder Herrn Dr. Reinhard Bierl, abgesprochen werden.

Bachelor-Themen

Working title:

Urbanization impacts on the hydrological regime of the Olewiger Bach –
Data processing and flood statistics

 

Since the nineties, the hydrology department of the University of Trier operates a gauging station at the Olewiger Bach within the City of Trier. During the same period, increasing building activities within the catchment changed the surface properties and thus the hydrological response of the catchment. The hypothesis for the proposed thesis is “there is an identifiable effect of building activities on the hydrological regime of the Olewiger Bach”.

The proposed work contains data processing of water level observations measured at three gauging stations within the Olewiger Bach catchment and a recalculation of the water/level discharge-relationships applied at the catchment outlet. The resulting discharge time-series will be analyzed regarding the regime properties and hydrological responses during heavy rainfall events.

Task: Data analysis

Supervisor: Tobias Schuetz, Hydrology Department, tobias.schuetzuni-trierde, +49/651/201-3071

Working title:

High resolution monitoring of nutrient / DOC retention in an urban stream system

 
  • adaptable to MSc or BSc Level

Wastewater treatment plant effluents can negatively affect stream water quality. Due to an increased number of effluents in urban catchments, these effects can be observed clearly within urban stream systems. Nevertheless, the self-purification potential of these stream systems can be quite high. The hypotheses for this experimental study is “Continuous high resolution monitoring of nutrient/DOC concentrations allows the identification of the self-purification potential in urban stream systems”.

Within these theses the candidates will first (Research Project) establish a high resolution monitoring station for the continuous monitoring of dissolved oxygen concentrations, pH, water temperatures, turbidity, nutrient (N-species) and DOC concentrations in the “Olewiger Bach”-system and secondly analyze observed dynamics of Nutrients/DOC in relation to oxygen, pH and water temperature dynamics using simple ecological modelling approaches.

Working field: Field-measurements and water chemistry laboratory (NO3 / DOC)

Supervisor: Tobias Schuetz, Hydrology Department, tobias.schuetzuni-trierde, +49/651/201-3071

 

Master-Themen

Working title:

Isotopic signatures of nitrogen cycling in waste water treatment plants
 

 

Specific technical setups in waste water treatment plants (biological treatment) have an impact on the degree of re-mineralization of ammonium loads into nitrate, nitrite or elementary nitrogen. The hypothesis, which will be tested within this thesis is “the technical setup of a biological treatment plant has a distinct imprint on the isotopic signature of emitted nitrate loads”.

Within this thesis the candidate will re-establish and apply an existing lab method for the analysis of nitrate 15-N and nitrate 18-O (Research project) and will identify and interpret the isotopic signature of nitrate loads measured at waste water effluents of several local waste water treatment plants around the city of Trier.

Working field: Isotope Laboratory

Supervisor: Tobias Schuetz, Hydrology Department, tobias.schuetzuni-trierde, +49/651/201-3071

Working title:

Micro pollutants in river systems – Long-term trends and export processes
 

 

Increasing numbers of organic chemicals ("Cocktails") are emitted into surface water bodies. Identifying critical sources and their temporally variable influence on surface water quality allows for improving water resources management practices.

In this thesis the student will study the temporal variation (intra vs inter annual variation) of water and matter fluxes in 22 meso-scale catchments observed from the 90ties onwards until today.

The observed dynamics will be related to landscape features (GIS-analysis) using principal component analysis and statistics.

Working field: Data analysis

Supervisor: Tobias Schuetz, Hydrology Department, tobias.schuetzuni-trierde, +49/651/201-3071

Working title:

Microplastic contamination in sewage sludge treated soils
 

 

Wastewater treatment plants receive and have received large amounts of microplastics emitted from households, industry and surface run-off in urban areas. Most of these microplastics is not removed during the treatment process and accumulate in the sewage sludge. Over the last 25 years huge amounts of sludge have been used as a fertilizer on agricultural soils and pastures.  Via the sludge the particles are transferred to the soils.There is very little knowledge on the contamination and on the effect of microplastics on soil organisms, and their impact on productivity and food safety is almost unknown.

The proposed thesis includes the development of a suitable procedure to extract microplastics from different soils, the identification of the plastic particles by spectroscopic methods and an attempt to quantify the accumulation.

Field: Analytical determination of polymers in environmental samples

Supervisor: Reinhard Bierl, Hydrology Department, Bierluni-trierde, Campus II, H226, +49/651/201-3075

Working title:

High resolution monitoring of nutrient / DOC retention in an urban stream system
 

 
  • adaptable to MSc or BSc Level

Wastewater treatment plant effluents can negatively affect stream water quality. Due to an increased number of effluents in urban catchments, these effects can be observed clearly within urban stream systems. Nevertheless, the self-purification potential of these stream systems can be quite high. The hypotheses for this experimental study is “Continuous high resolution monitoring of nutrient/DOC concentrations allows the identification of the self-purification potential in urban stream systems”.

Within these theses the candidates will first (Research Project) establish a high resolution monitoring station for the continuous monitoring of dissolved oxygen concentrations, pH, water temperatures, turbidity, nutrient (N-species) and DOC concentrations in the “Olewiger Bach”-system and secondly analyze observed dynamics of Nutrients/DOC in relation to oxygen, pH and water temperature dynamics using simple ecological modelling approaches.

Working field: Field-measurements and water chemistry laboratory (NO3 / DOC)

Supervisor: Tobias Schuetz, Hydrology Department, tobias.schuetzuni-trierde, +49/651/201-3071