Canadian Studies Centre


Welcome to the website of the Canadian Studies Centre at the University of Trier!

On our website, we provide information about our Centre, news of current activities and teaching, different archives, a list of the Centre's publications, a host of weblinks and much more.

Free Spots at the University of Manitoba for Exchange Students 2019/2020

In the course of an exchange programme, the University of Trier offers again up to two free spots at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg for the academic year 2019/2020.

The Centre for Canadian Studies highly encourages students to apply for these spots as it presents a wonderful opportunity not only to gain insights into Canadian culture but also into academic life abroad.

For more information on the University of Manitoba, please click here.

For more information on the exchange including access to application forms and contact details, please click here. Deadline is December 3, 2018.

Farewell to Guest Professors of Summer Term 2018

Prof. Stephan Jaeger (German Studies), Prof. Priya S. Mani (Education, both from the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg) and Prof. Eleanor Ty (English and Film Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo) were follwing an invitation from the Canadian Studies Centre and spent their time in Trier with research, exchange, and teaching. The team of the Canadian Studies Centre enjoyed enormously hosting these interesting academics of different disciplines and appreciates deeply the constructive and fruitful collaboration. We are very much looking forward to further cooperations in the future!

International Symposium "Failures East and West" at Trier University, June 7 - 9 2018

"Cultural encounters between East Asia and the West have received ample attention in various fields of studies ranging from cultural and literary studies to history and economy – failure in these encounters, however, has not. Often, the story of encounters between Asia and the West has been told as one of success, of cross-fertilisation, reciprocal stimulation and an exchange of commodities and knowledge. Yet, while individual encounters might indeed have been beneficial to the parties involved, the history of East-West encounters is riddled with prominent examples of failure caused by misunderstandings, ignorance, unrealistic expectations or unbridgeable cultural differences. These failures are often occluded by historiography and neglected in academic research in favour of interactions deemed more successful. We believe this to be an unduly limited approach and would hold that the study of failures might prove as fruitful as the study of seemingly successful encounters. For failures can be telling failures indeed, revealing culturally informed expectations and biases, performative and linguistic practices and imaginative horizons specific to the cultures involved.

Our symposium aims to discuss cases of failure in encounters between East Asian cultures such as Greater China, Japan and Korea on the one hand, and those of Europe and North America on the other, ranging from first encounters in the early modern period to contemporary examples."

See https://failureseastwest2018.com/ for more information. Guests are always welcome!

Call for Papers for a Special Issue on “Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings”

It is now commonly accepted that Canadian literature has become a global literature, implying that any understanding of textual localities is traversed by vectors that exceed, complicate, and extend the nation in physical, historical, and cultural ways. But the gaze is seldom reversed and little attention has been paid to the role of international scholarship in the current transformation and development of the field.

How are Canadian texts read and circulated beyond the national borders? What is the place of Canadian literature in the institutional spaces of universities outside Canada? How do those transnational contexts negotiate the relationship between texts and readers? Are there defining differences in the ways non-Canadian scholars approach CanLit? How does transnational scholarship influence, challenge, enrich, and rescale Canadian literary production?

This special issue invites scholars of Canadian literature from around the globe to engage critically with any aspect of Canadian literary production, dissemination, or reception. Essays should implicitly bring to view the two-way direction of reading and writing Canadian literature globally, demonstrating the porosity of transnational scholarship as well as advancing innovative perspectives that may contribute to the rescaling of the field.

All submissions to Canadian Literature must be original, unpublished work. Essays should follow current MLA bibliographic format (8th ed).
Articles should be between 6500 and 7000 words, including endnotes and works cited.

Submissions should be uploaded to Canadian Literature’s online submissions system (OJS) by the extended deadline of June 1, 2018. 

The guest editor of this issue will be Eva Darias-Beautell of University of La Laguna, Spain.

The information given above is also available here.

Presentation by Professor Stephan Jaeger (University of Manitoba): June 13, 2018 at 6 p.m.; University of Trier, Room E52

“Diverse Stories of Violence: 21st-Century Museums of the Second World War in North America and Europe”

 

The talk will analyze – with specific emphasis on narrative, collective memory, and experience – how today’s museums can represent and recreate the past of the Second World War. What forms of national, transnational, and universal memory do emerge? Do they create homogeneous stories or allow for diversity in historical perspectives and interpretations? Examples discussed include the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa, the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg, the Bundeswehr Military History Museum in Dresden, the German-Russian Museum in Berlin-Karlshorst, the House of European History in Brussels, and the Second World War Museum in Gdansk.

 

Dr. Stephan Jaeger is Professor of German Studies and Head of the Department of German and Slavic Studies, at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. He researches on narratives, representations and memory of war in German and European literature, film, historiography, and museums. His publications include two monographs Theorie lyrischen Ausdrucks (Fink 2001), Performative Geschichtsschreibung (de Gruyter 2011) and five coedited books including Fighting Words and Images: Representing War across the Disciplines (U of Toronto P 2012) and a special issue of Seminar (2014): Representations of German War Experiences from the Eighteenth Century to the Present. Currently he is completing a monograph on twenty-first century museum representations of the Second World War in Europe and North America.

IRTG Diversity and Trier Canadian Studies Centre Welcome Numerous Visiting Scholars

The IRTG Diversity and the Canadian Studies Centre at the University of Trier (ZKS) are very much looking forward to an exciting first half of 2018. The two collaborating institutions are welcoming 10 visiting scholars from three different countries and many different disciplines to Trier and Saarbrücken. Besides conducting their own research, exchanges and collaborations with the IRTG’s PhD candidates will be a vital part of each visitor’s stay in Germany.

At the beginning of 2018 Dr. Kati Dlaske, who had already been a visiting scholar at the IRTG Diversity in 2017, returned to Trier, while the ZKS welcomed Prof. Stephan Jaeger and Prof. Priya S. Mani, who will stay in Trier for an extended research visit until June 2018.

The following scholars will be guests at the IRTG Diversity and the ZKS:

January/February 2018:
Dr. Kati Dlaske (Language and Communication Studies, University of Jyväskylä, Finland)

February 2018:
Prof. Mary Jane McCallum (History, University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Canada)

January - June 2018:
Prof. Stephan Jaeger (German Studies, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada)
Prof. Priya S. Mani (Education, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada)

March 2018:
Prof. Marciana Popescu (Sociology, Fordham University, New York, USA) 

April 2018:
Prof. Matthew Heinz (Interdisciplinary Studies, Royal Roads University, Victoria, Canada) 

May/June 2018:
Prof. Sharon Carson (English and Religious Studies, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND, USA)
Prof. Eleanor Ty (English and Film Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Canada)

June/July 2018:
Prof. Paul Morris (Comparative Literature, Université de St. Boniface, Winnipeg, Canada)
Prof. Emma Anderson (Religious Studies, University of Ottawa, Canada)

June - August 2018:
Prof. Rosalind Beiler (History, University of Central Florida, USA)

Guest lectures and other events involving our visitors will be announced via the homepages and Facebook profiles of the IRTG Diversity and the ZKS.

1st Call for Papers: Biennial Partnership Conference September 20-21, 2018 University of Manitoba, Canada

Treasury, Guardian, Cognitive Process: Memory Studies in Canada and Germany

University of Manitoba – University of Trier – University of Greifswald

 

“Memory is the treasury and guardian of all things.” – Marcus Tullius Cicero

We live in one of the great ages of memory, a time in which forces have converged to push memory to the forefront of our moral, political, scientific, and aesthetic lives. Some have even referred to the current moment as being characterized by a “memory boom.” The standard view of this boom is that it has come about owing to a variety of factors, including, a decline in confidence in “modernist” narratives of progress over the course of the twentieth century, the rise of consumer culture, which has turned nostalgia into a commodity, and multiculturalism and individualism, which have in related ways fragmented our collective sense of self, forcing nation-states to turn to the real or imagined past to buttress their legitimacy. Memory has been further bolstered by the Holocaust and other such horrors, which have called into question the integrity of our moral imaginations and ushered in what has been called “a culture of trauma and regret.” We find this culture at work in public institutions such as memorials and museums, as well as in the proliferation of media representations of the personal past. It is also evident in such socially and politically transformative agencies and processes as truth commissions and public inquiries.

Proposals are invited for an interdisciplinary conference on the subject of memory. The conference, to be held at the University of Manitoba, is in partnership with the Trier University. The scope of the conference is broad, and the theme is intended to encompass scholarship on all forms of memory (personal, collective, institutional, cognitive, etc.). Of particular interest is work pertaining to memory as it is understood, and circulates (is celebrated, contested, etc.), in Canadian and German academic and cultural contexts. Presentations are welcome to address works and issues from different fields, media, and conceptual perspectives.

Paper, and/or panel proposals, including a short one page c.v. should be sent to either Dr. James Fergusson (James.Fergussonad.umanitobaca), Dr. Adam Muller (Adam.Mullerumanitobaca) or Dr. Gene Walz (walzcc.umanitobaca) no later than April 30, 2018. It is expected that funding will be available for accommodations and local costs.

Canada-Afternoon (24.11.2016)

Canada will celebrate its 150th birthday in 2017. In anticipation of this occasion, the Canadian Studies Centre at the University of Trier (ZKS) has organised an interdisciplinary information session with the German-Canadian society (DKG) and the international research training group "Diversity" (IRTG). Introductory presentations on history, geography, literature, art, music, and tourism offered first insights into the political, societal and cultural development of Canada. Additionally, students were introduced to study possibilites and the program "Work & Travel in Canada".

Time: 16:00 to 18:30h
Location: Guest room at the University of Trier

For further information, click here.

17. Partnership Conference (May 11-14, 2016)

Wor(l)ds of Trauma: Canadian and German Perspectives

Participants: Universities of Trier and Manitoba
Venue: Guest room of Trier University

For further information, please click here.

Prestigious Award for Canadian Scholarship

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Klooß is the first German scholar to be honored with the International Award for Canadian Studies.

Mr. Wolfgang Klooß, Director of the interdisciplinary Centre for Canadian Studies at the University of Trier, will be honored with the prestigious Governor General's International Award for Canadian Studies. He is the first German scholar to receive the award which is being granted each year in recognition of outstanding contributions to the development of Canadian Studies.

Since 1991, Mister Klooß has been the Director of the interdisciplinary Centre for Canadian Studies, a central academic institution at the University of Trier. Before his retirement in 2013, he was holder of the chair in English Literature at the University of Trier. Besides, Mister Klooß was president of the Association for Canadian Studies in German-speaking countries and member of the International Council for Canadian Studies. As Dean of the Humanities Faculty and vice president of the University of Trier, he was also engaged in collegiate self-governance. He is now a Fellow of St. John's College at the University of Manitoba.

Most of his cultural and historical works on Canadian literature are devoted to various topics and authors of the 19th, 20th and 21st century. With his prize-winning monograph on the Canadian Métis and numerous smaller studies, there is, however, a certain focus on the Canadian Aboriginal peoples. Klooß is also a member of the International Research Training Group "Diversity".

His nomination was submitted by the Association for Canadian Studies in German-speaking countries, whose former president Ursula Lehmkuhl is also a Canadian Studies scholar at the University of Trier. In addition to the Governor General's Award, Stefanie Fritzenkötter from the Romance department will be honored with the Dissertation Award of the International Council for Canadian Studies.

Professor Klooß will receive the Governor General's International Award during a ceremony at Trent University in Peterborough (Ontario) on May 23th, 2015.

International Research Training Group "Diversity"

On 1 April 2013, the International Research Training Group "Diversity" (IRTG) has officially been established. The participating institutions are the Universities of Trier, Saarbrücken, and Montréal. You will find further information below:


Website of the International Research Training Group (IRTG)

Article on the IRTG in the journal of the University of Trier (3/2013) 


Contact

Klemens Wedekind
IRTG Diversity
Tel.: +49 (0) 651 201-3316
E-Mail: wedekinduni-trierde

Festschrift in honor of Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Klooß

F(e)asting Fitness? Cultural Images,
Social Practices, and Histories of Food and Health

Is this an appetizing treat for those fit enough to stomach a surprise or two? this Fe(a)stschrift in honor of Wolfgang Klooß - reflecting his academic and personal pursuits - challenges our understanding of how health, food, and fitness interact: Whether charting the practice of cannibalism as survival strategy, or early forms of cooking and food exchange, or excessive and sophisticated consumption in North America; whether detailing the calorie control in postwar Germany, or the feeding of the poor in nineteenth-century England, or the human enhancement program for super soldiers; whether tracing the sexuality of the aging, or the nation-building discourses in the context of the Vancouver Olympics and of hockey movies - this collection provides a menu of twenty-one diverse dishes that both entertain and nourish more than just a hungry intellect. Spicing up the essays by German and Canadian scholars, this serving includes seven mostly short literary texts (one involving the assistance of a wooden chef) by renowned Canadian authors. As these contributions offer their digestions on the cultural images, social practices, and histories inherent in the topic, they demonstrate how fine a line there often is between fasting and feasting fitness.

Annekatrin Metz, Markus M. Müller, Lutz Schowalter (Eds.)

For further information on the book and on how to order, please click here.