Vergangene Veranstaltungen

2022

1st Kant Research Centre Trier Workshop "Essences, Dispositions and Laws in Kant" | August 25-26

Essences Workshop Poster

Trier University

Room A9/A10

Programme

After a long time of neglect, there has been a recent rediscovery of essences in the Kantian scholarship which seems to reflect the increased interest in essences in contemporary metaphysics (e.g., Armstrong 1983, Ellis 2001, Bird 2007). However, essentialist readings of the critical Kant’s philosophy of nature come in very different flavours: One prominent example is the influential ‘essentialist’ account of laws (e.g., Watkins 2005, Kreines 2008, Stang 2016). Minimally, this account argues that, for the Critical Kant, the necessity of laws is grounded in the essences or natures of things. A closely related account is that Kant can be interpreted as a precursor of ‘dispositional essentialism’ (Massimi 2017, Messina 2017) and a more distant view has it that the essences of the properties necessitating a certain behaviour are to be conceived as dispositional (Engelhard 2018). More generally, the rehabilitation of essences or dispositions in Kant’s metaphysics has important consequences for his general theory of modality and metaphysical grounding.

Despite such rediscovery, several questions from both a metaphysical and epistemological point of view have not been fully answered so far. What are essences for Kant? Should they be distinguished from other key terms in his metaphysics, such as ‘natures’ or ‘grounds’? If essences ground the necessity of laws, what kind of necessity are they the source of? Should we think essences in dispositional terms, and if so, how exactly? Are essences beyond the possibility of knowledge or can they be object of some kind of cognition? What kind of investigation of nature do they afford? The aim of this summer school and conference is to shed light on these and other related questions, as well as to discuss the historical background of Kant’s views and to explore the implications of essentialism for other areas of his Critical philosophy.

 

Speakers

Hein van den Berg (Amsterdam)
Angela Breitenbach (Cambridge)
Andrew Cooper (Warwick)
Kristina Engelhard (Trier)
Ido Geiger (Ben Gurion)
Stephen Howard (Leuven)
James Kreines (Claremont)
Michael Bennett McNulty (Minnesota)
James Messina (Madison)
Lorenzo Spagnesi (Trier)
Daniel Warren (Berkeley)

 

Organisers: Lorenzo Spagnesi (Trier), Kristina Engelhard (Trier)

For registration please contact Lorenzo Spagnesi (spagnesi@uni-trier.de)

Workshop Website

1st Kant Research Centre Trier Summer School "Essences, Dispositions and Laws in Kant" | August 22-24

Summerschool Poster

Trier University

Room B 22

Instructors:  James Kreines (Claremont), Michael Bennett McNulty (Minnesota)

• Workshop and Summerschool Website
• Summer School Program

After a long time of neglect, there has been a recent rediscovery of essences in the Kantian scholarship which seems to reflect the increased interest in essences in contemporary metaphysics (e.g., Armstrong 1983, Ellis 2001, Bird 2007). However, essentialist readings of the critical Kant’s philosophy of nature come in very different flavours: One prominent example is the influential ‘essentialist’ account of laws (e.g., Watkins 2005, Kreines 2008, Stang 2016). Minimally, this account argues that, for the Critical Kant, the necessity of laws is grounded in the essences or natures of things. A closely related account is that Kant can be interpreted as a precursor of ‘dispositional essentialism’ (Massimi 2017, Messina 2017) and a more distant view has it that the essences of the properties necessitating a certain behaviour are to be conceived as dispositional (Engelhard 2018). More generally, the rehabilitation of essences or dispositions in Kant’s metaphysics has important consequences for his general theory of modality and metaphysical grounding.

Despite such rediscovery, several questions from both a metaphysical and epistemological point of view have not been fully answered so far. What are essences for Kant? Should they be distinguished from other key terms in his metaphysics, such as ‘natures’ or ‘grounds’? If essences ground the necessity of laws, what kind of necessity are they the source of? Should we think essences in dispositional terms, and if so, how exactly? Are essences beyond the possibility of knowledge or can they be object of some kind of cognition? What kind of investigation of nature do they afford? The aim of this summer school and conference is to shed light on these and other related questions, as well as to discuss the historical background of Kant’s views and to explore the implications of essentialism for other areas of his Critical philosophy.

The summer school aims at junior scholars, PhD students, as well as master’s students. It will be taught by two major experts in the field: James Kreines (Claremont McKenna College) and Michael Bennett McNulty (University of Minnesota). Lecturers will introduce key primary and secondary texts and facilitate seminar discussion among participants (further details will follow shortly). Participants are welcome to attend the workshop taking place immediately after the summer school.

If you want to attend the summer school, please register by sending an email with your name, contact information, and short bio (no more than 300 words) to Lorenzo Spagnesi (spagnesi@uni-trier.de).

Organisers: Lorenzo Spagnesi (Trier), Kristina Engelhard (Trier)

For registration please contact: Lorenzo Spagnesi (spagnesi@uni-trier.de)

The summerschool is linked to the workshop Essences, Dispositions and Laws in Kant

Dispositions in the Life-Sciences. Contemporary and Historical Perspectives | June 2-3

Dispositions in the Life Sciences

Trier University, C22 / D034 / V 302 (Senatssaal)

dispositionsinthelifesciences.weebly.com

The metaphysics of dispositional properties is a topic relevant to the philosophy of the (life) sciences, the history of philosophy, and contemporary metaphysics.

Dispositional concepts are ubiquitous in the life sciences. Crucial technical notions from various disciplines, such as stemness, pluripotency, boldness, arachnophobia, evolvability, plasticity, or fitness exhibit dispositional features that require philosophical attention. While most philosophical work on dispositions focuses on everyday examples, the life sciences offer interesting and novel insights on the topic, and opportunities for contrasting philosophical theories against particular scientific practices.

On the other hand, the philosophical debate on dispositions has also proved a useful tool for interpreting historical positions in philosophy. For example, there is a branch of Kant scholarship that understands his account of forces and powers in terms of a form of dispositionalism. So far, this has been proposed for his philosophy of physics. But it seems particularly appropriate for his philosophy of biology in the Critique of the Power of Judgment, which is particularly concerned with the dichotomy between mechanistic and teleological explanations of biological systems. Dispositionalist readings have been proposed for Aristotle’s metaphysics, too. It is hence also a worthwhile project to ask for dispositionalist readings of his views on living beings.

This workshop aims at discussing views on dispositions in the life sciences from a contemporary and from a historical perspective. It focuses on contemporary views in the philosophy of science that take scientific practice as their fundament and wants to cross a bridge to historical accounts that model biological systems by dispositional properties.

 

The workshop takes place as part of the research group “Inductive Metaphysics” (https://indmet.weebly.com), funded by DFG (German Research Foundation).

     

Speakers

Rani Lill Anjum (Aas)
Christopher J. Austin (Durham)
Kristina Engelhard (Trier)
Andrea Gambarotto (Leuven)
Fabian Hundertmark (Bielefeld)
Marie I. Kaiser (Bielefeld)
Alan Love (Minnesota)
James Messina (Madison)
Elena Rocca (Aas)
María Ferreira Ruiz (Bielefeld)
Gil Santos (Lisbon)
Javier Suárez Díaz (Oviedo and Krakow)
Davide Vecchi (Lisbon)

 

Programme

 

Organizers: Kristina Engelhard (Trier), Lorenzo Spagnesi (Trier), Fabian Hundertmark (Bielefeld), Marie I. Kaiser (Bielefeld), María Ferreira Ruiz (Bielefeld), Javier Suárez Díaz (Oviedo and Krakow)​.


2021

10. Trierer Kant-Kolloquium "Immanuel Kant: Der Streit der Fakultäten" | Oktober 13-15

TRKK Poster

10. Trierer Kant-Kolloquium

"Immanuel Kant: Der Streit der Fakultäten"

Universität Trier

13. bis 15. Oktober 2021

Hörsaal C 9

Programm

Sprecherinnen und Sprecher

Sebastian Abel (Halle)
Henny Blomme (Leuven)
Bernd Dörflinger (Trier)
Andree Hahmann (Beijing)
Philipp-Alexander Hirsch (Göttingen)
Hendrik Klinge (Wuppertal)
Stefan Klingner (Göttingen)
Giuseppe Motta (Wien)
Katharina Probst (Trier)
Karoline Reinhardt (Tübingen)
Gianluca Sadun Bordoni (Teramo)
Maja Soboleva (Klagenfurt)
Gideon Stiening (Münster)

Wie in den vergangenen Jahren wird die Kant-Forschungsstelle der Universität Trier auch in diesem Jahr das Trierer Kant-Kolloquium durchführen. Diesmal wird mit „Der Streit der Fakultäten“ Kants letzte von ihm selbst veröffentlichte Schrift im Zentrum stehen, in der er das Verhältnis der Fakultäten zueinander, vor allem aber die Aufgabe und Rolle der philosophischen Fakultät zu klären versucht. Das Verhältnis der Fakultäten zueinander begreift Kant als einen Rechtsstreit der drei oberen (Theologie, Recht, Medizin) gegen die untere Fakultät (Philosophie), der vor dem Gerichtshof der Vernunft geführt wird. Dieser Streit sei unvermeidbar, könne von der Vernunft aber durchaus entschieden werden. In Vorträgen zu allen drei Teilen der Schrift werden deren Inhalte vorgestellt, kontextualisiert und zur Diskussion gestellt.

Wie für das Trierer Kant-Kolloquium üblich, wird es unter Beteiligung von auswärtigen Referentinnen und Referenten aus dem Inland sowie aus Belgien, Italien, Österreich und China sowie von Studierenden stattfinden.

Organisation: Dieter Hüning (Trier), Stefan Klinger (Göttingen)

Eine Online-Teilnahme wird möglich sein.

Aufgrund der begrenzten Räumlichkeiten wird um Anmeldung unter huening@uni-trier.de gebeten. Dort erhalten Sie auch den Zoom-Link.

Ernst Ferdinand Klein Philosoph, Strafrechtswissenschaftler und Justizreformer der deutschen Aufklärung | Oktober 7-9

Klein Plakat

Interdisziplinäre Tagung

7. bis 9. Oktober 2021

Alte Mensa der Universität Göttingen

Programm

Mit Beiträgen von

Hans Erich Bödeker (Göttingen)
Martin Brecher (Mannheim)
Armin Emmel (Mannheim)
Vanda Fiorillo (Neapel)
Philipp-Alexander Hirsch (Göttingen)
Dieter Hüning ( T r i e r )
Isabel Karremann(Zürich)
Michael Kleensang (Heidelberg)
Stefan Klingner (Göttingen)
Diethelm Klippel (Bayreuth)
Milan Kuhli (Hamburg)
Christoph Eric Mecke (Hannover)
Katerina Mihaylova (Halle)
Florian Schmidt (Tübingen)
Dietrich Schotte (Leipzig)
Sebastian Speth (Münster)
Gideon Stiening(Münster)
Benno Zabel (Bonn)

Öffentlicher Abendvortrag vonFrank Grunert (Halle): 
„Schöne Rechtsgelehrsamkeit“ Kleins publizistische Initiativen"

Ernst Ferdinand Klein zählt zu denbedeutenden Figuren der deutschen Spätaufklärung. Als Philosoph, als Strafrechtswissenschaftler und als Justizreformer hat er im ausgehenden 18. Jahrhundert nicht nur den wissenschaftlichen Diskurs auf diesen Gebieten prägend mitgestaltet, sondern als Publizist auch die öffentliche Meinungsbildung zu den damit zusammenhängenden gesellschaftspolitischen Fragen nachhaltig bestimmt. Zugleich standen und stehen die historische Persönlichkeit Kleins und sein Schaffen bislang kaum im Fokus der Forschung. Daher sind die Innovationen, die Klein in den Diskussionen seiner Zeit angeregt, und die Synthesen, die er auf den zuvor genannten Gebieten geleistet hat, in ihrer Bedeutung von der Forschung bislang nicht hinreichend zur Kenntnis genommen worden. Gleichzeitig fehlt es an einer umfassendenBetrachtung des Klein’schen Schaffens, die Querverbindungen zwischen den Beiträgen auf seinen verschiedenen Tätigkeitsfeldern zieht und ein umfassendes Bild von Klein zeichnet. Dem will die Tagung „Ernst Ferdinand Klein. Philosoph, Strafrechtswissenschaftler und Justizreformer der deutschen Aufklärung“ abhelfen und setzt sich zum Ziel, das Werk Kleins in seiner gesamten Breite zu beleuchten, eine genaue Rekonstruktion der internen Strukturen seines Œuvres zu leisten und Kleins theoretische Leistungen, seine historische Bedeutung und die zeitgenössische, z.T. kontroverse Rezeption aufzuzeigen.

Ausrichter: Philipp-Alexander Hirsch, Dieter Hüning & Gideon Stiening

Anmeldung und Informationen https://www.uni-goettingen.de/de/645272.html

Workshop Metaphysics as Modeling. Contemporary and Kantian Issues | October 7-8

Modeling Plakat

University of Trier, Germany
October 7.-8. 2021

Speakers

Katherine Brading
Kristina Engelhard
Brigitte Falkenburg
David Hommen
Siegfried Jaag
Michela Massimi
James O' Shea
Laurie Ann Paul
Markus Schrenk
Lorenzo Spagnesi

The use of models such as the Lotka-Volterra model for predator/prey-population-dynamics or the billiard ball model of gases have proven to be tremendously useful in the natural sciences. Here, we adopt the minimal working assumption that a “model is an imagined or hypothetical structure that we describe and investigate in the hope of using it to understand some more complex, real- world ‘target’ system or domain” (Godfrey-Smith 2006a, 6).

Recently, philosophers have suggested that applying models in metaphysics is also a legitimate, beneficial and necessary enterprise (Godfrey-Smith 2006a, 2012; Nolan 2005; Paul 2012; Brading manuscript for a critique). As examples for models in metaphysics have been given: Humean supervenience and Armstrong’s anti-Humeanism (Godfrey-Smith 2006a, 16) or the neuron diagrams in theories of causation (Paul 2012, 14), etc.

Using models in philosophy would not only make its method (even more) continuous with scientific method (which seems desirable to some), it has also been argued that applying models in metaphysics helps us to see progress in metaphysics/philosophy (Williamson 2017; 2018, ch. 10), for a modeling attitude might have the potential to make metaphysical theories more error robust: compare the scientific practice of curve-fitting that results in more robust and less error-fragile theories (see Forster and Sober 1994) to the excessive focus on counterexamples that is central to the so-called method of cases in philosophy. Once metaphysical theories are considered as models not just any intuitive verdicts about particular cases could play a decisive role in undermining such a theory/model.

If modeling plays a role in metaphysics, then the question also arises whether examples of it can be found in the history of philosophy or even approaches that reflect on it, albeit in different terms. In fact, in Kant's work, there are parts of his theory that can be interpreted as a modeling approach in metaphysics. His theory of the regulative use of transcendental ideas, for example, possibly allows such an interpretation. And there is also evidence in the "Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science" that Kant understood his dynamic theory of matter as a metaphysical model based on the theory of transcendental ideas.

Organizers: Kristina Engelhard (Trier), David Hommen (Trier), Siegfried Jaag (Düsseldorf), Markus Schrenk (Düsseldorf)

The workshop takes place as part of the research group “Inductive Metaphysics” (https://indmet.weebly.com), funded by DFG.

Conference Website